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Seaweed and Tofu Beignets with Lime Mayonnaise

Seaweed and Tofu Beignets with Lime Mayonnaise


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At Alma, Los Angeles, these airy beignets are topped with yuzu kosho, a spicy condiment made with yuzu (an aromatic Japanese citrus), chile, and salt. Though not the same, we got great results using lemons.

Ingredients

Lime Mayonnaise

  • 1 tsp. finely grated lime zest
  • 1 cup grapeseed or vegetable oil

Lemon-jalapeño paste

  • 1 jalapeño, with seeds, chopped

Seaweed and Tofu Beignets

  • ½ cup dried wakame (seaweed)
  • 1½ cups all-purpose flour
  • 1½ tsp. kosher salt plus more
  • 3 oz. soft (silken) tofu (about ⅓ cup)
  • 1 cup (or more) club soda
  • Vegetable oil (for frying; about 3 cups)

Recipe Preparation

Lime Mayonnaise

  • Whisk egg yolk and lime zest and juice in a medium bowl. Whisking constantly, slowly add oil, drop by drop at first, and whisk until mayonnaise is thickened and smooth; season with salt.

  • DO AHEAD: Lime mayonnaise can be made 1 day ahead. Cover and chill.

Lemon-Jalapeño Paste

  • Finely grate lemon zest; then, using a small knife, remove peel and pith and discard. Halve lemon; remove seeds from flesh. Pulse lemon zest and flesh and jalapeño in a food processor until smooth. Transfer to a fine-mesh sieve and press out liquid; discard liquid. Place paste in a small bowl; season with salt.

  • DO AHEAD: Paste can be made 1 day ahead. Cover and chill.

Seaweed and Tofu Beignet

  • Place wakame in a small bowl; add warm water to cover. Let stand until softened, about 10 minutes. Drain; squeeze wakame to remove excess water and coarsely chop.

  • Whisk flour, baking soda, and salt in a large bowl. Whisk in wakame, egg yolk, tofu, and 1 cup club soda, adding more club soda if batter is too thick (it should be the consistency of pancake batter.)

  • Fit a medium saucepan with thermometer; pour in oil to measure 2". Heat over medium-high heat until thermometer registers 350°. Working in batches and returning oil to 350° between batches, drop tablespoonfuls of batter into oil and fry, turning occasionally, until crisp, cooked through, and deep golden brown, about 4 minutes. Transfer beignets to a paper towel–lined plate; season with salt.

  • Dot serving plates with lime mayonnaise; place beignets on plates and dab each one with lemon-jalapeño paste.

  • Do Ahead: Batter can be made 1 hour ahead (do not add baking soda and club soda). Cover and chill. Bring to room temperature and whisk in baking soda and club soda just before frying.

,Photos by Michael Graydon and Nikole Herriott

Nutritional Content

Calories (kcal) 410 Fat (g) 34 Saturated Fat (g) 5 Cholesterol (mg) 70 Carbohydrates (g) 24 Dietary Fiber (g) 2 Total Sugars (g) 1 Protein (g) 5 Sodium (mg) 1080Reviews SectionI made this recipe some time ago already (without the Lemon-jalapeño paste), and all I can remember is:1) It was not that hard to make as I would've imagined.2) It was super tasty!3) I hope I will find the time to make them again soon-ish.AnonymousVienna, Austria01/11/20

Counter Intelligence: Ari Taymor’s Alma stands apart in L.A.

If you had asked an observer a few years ago whether the future of dining in Los Angeles was more likely to be influenced by its mobile restaurants or its pop-ups, the money would have been on the trucks. Food trucks seemed to draw from everything about L.A. in 2010 — mobility, multiculturalism, social-media compulsion and the ceaseless drive toward novelty. The food truck culture rewards the short attention span. It rewards it with kimchi cheesesteaks.

But while the Kogi empire is still expanding, this may have been the year when restaurants born as pop-ups began to assert themselves. A pop-up — a restaurant temporarily operating within an existing restaurant — is a modest way for a young chef to build a following, try out new dishes and discover his or her style without the rigors of raising capital, negotiating with property barons or designing kitchens. It can be a reasonable way to begin a career.

Food trucks, on the other hand, tend not to scale well, and the limitations of road cooking, like those of the great-looking skateboarder you met at Coachella, become pretty apparent when transplanted into the confines of an actual building. A successful food truck doesn’t become a restaurant. It becomes three successful food trucks.

Pop-up chefs often turn out to be restaurant chefs. The mozzarella nights that Nancy Silverton brought to Jar and La Terza work just fine as a permanent fixture at Mozza. Mission Chinese, conceived as a maverick pop-up within a run-of-the-mill San Francisco Chinese restaurant, has become the most-talked-about new restaurant in New York.

This brings us to Ari Taymor, a young chef who cooked at Flour + Water and other well-regarded Bay Area restaurants before he moved south. Alma, his new downtown restaurant, began as many months of pop-ups in Los Angeles, and Taymor’s unassuming modernist cooking fit into underused spaces like a hermit crab into its shell.

When it slipped into its permanent space a few months ago, in a barely marked storefront next door to a taxi-dance parlor on South Broadway, it still felt like a pop-up. The most memorable bit of décor in the restaurant was a Chez Panisse poster displayed under cracked glass. The restaurant was refinished, and there are now sleek fixtures, blond-wood veneers and upholstered benches comfortable enough to lounge on for hours, but it will not be mistaken for Spago anytime soon.

A meal at Alma is likely to begin with seaweed and tofu beignets. The beignets superficially resemble the green tofu balls at Starry Kitchen, but the taste is closer to that of the hair-seaweed yellowfish fritters you see in Shanghainese restaurants. They are set on dabs of citrusy mayonnaise, and they are dabbed with a bit of yuzu kosho, a tart, fragrant paste of chile and Japanese yuzu zest.

You might see a spare salad, shreds of radicchio and curly endive interspersed with foraged chickweed, dock and oxalis, dressed with horseradish and a little crème fraîche, sprinkled with tiny bits of nuts and seeds. You are not quite sure what any one bite you are eating might be, but it tastes gloriously, of early California fall. Bowls of crisped sprouting broccoli, crunchy as any kale chips, hide spoonfuls of aioli reddened with Basque pepper. Slices of toasted baguette, smeared with puréed dates, are served with a smooth, cool mound of rabbit-liver mousse, rich as foie gras.

Alma is without an alcohol license at the moment, although one is pending, so the kitchen concocts its own, barely sweetened soda pops to match the cuisine — one with fresh ginger, a vanilla-black lime pop that reproduces most of the sensations of a California Chardonnay, and something called Red 40, flavored with beets. The food is pretty hard to pair with wine at any rate — of all the alcohol I’ve brought into Alma, the most successful was probably a super-funky bottle of natural Basque cider. When you ask about what to drink at the wine shop around the corner, the proprietor only shrugs.

You never quite know what you’re going to find at the restaurant, where the menu changes almost every night. One evening there might be a soup

of miso and puréed celery root, striking a teetering balance between earthiness and umami, spiked with a few cubes of pickled pear the next, a mild purée of parsnip and poached black garlic sweetened with apple or vegetables in a puddle of dashi, enhanced by what you later find out is not tofu but whipped ox marrow.

If you spot something ordinary like lamb, it will have been braised with super-salty clams and served on a bed of braised sunflower seeds swirled on the plate in a way that makes them look like a school of sardines. (Could the seeds really be all pointing in the same direction, or is that a visual trick?) You will all but ignore the crackly skinned roast chicken when you come across the sweet, shriveled, butter-soaked carrots on the plate. (Those carrots are often served as a main course too, and you don’t have to be a vegetarian to think that they are the best things at the restaurant.)

You may have seen dishes like this at Manresa or Coi in the Bay Area, but nobody is cooking quite like this in L.A. at the moment. This is a modest but sure step toward the cuisine most often seen in restaurants with six-month waiting lists and $145 tasting menus.

Taymor and his cooks work behind a diner counter, gliding between the cold station and the stove, stopping occasionally by the immersion circulator, the Pacojet, and the high-tech blender breaking up trayfuls of cake into ragged shards and measuring out purées by the spoonful. Taymor works with a forager, so your plates are likely to include three different kinds of sweet clover instead of basil or thyme.

I once asked him about a clump of vivid, translucent fruit garnishing a scallop, and he told me they were nightshade berries.

“Don’t worry,” he said. “The leaves would make you pretty sick. But the berries? The berries are fine.”


Counter Intelligence: Ari Taymor’s Alma stands apart in L.A.

If you had asked an observer a few years ago whether the future of dining in Los Angeles was more likely to be influenced by its mobile restaurants or its pop-ups, the money would have been on the trucks. Food trucks seemed to draw from everything about L.A. in 2010 — mobility, multiculturalism, social-media compulsion and the ceaseless drive toward novelty. The food truck culture rewards the short attention span. It rewards it with kimchi cheesesteaks.

But while the Kogi empire is still expanding, this may have been the year when restaurants born as pop-ups began to assert themselves. A pop-up — a restaurant temporarily operating within an existing restaurant — is a modest way for a young chef to build a following, try out new dishes and discover his or her style without the rigors of raising capital, negotiating with property barons or designing kitchens. It can be a reasonable way to begin a career.

Jonathan Gold Quiz: HamburgersFood trucks, on the other hand, tend not to scale well, and the limitations of road cooking, like those of the great-looking skateboarder you met at Coachella, become pretty apparent when transplanted into the confines of an actual building. A successful food truck doesn’t become a restaurant. It becomes three successful food trucks.

Pop-up chefs often turn out to be restaurant chefs. The mozzarella nights that Nancy Silverton brought to Jar and La Terza work just fine as a permanent fixture at Mozza. Mission Chinese, conceived as a maverick pop-up within a run-of-the-mill San Francisco Chinese restaurant, has become the most-talked-about new restaurant in New York.

This brings us to Ari Taymor, a young chef who cooked at Flour + Water and other well-regarded Bay Area restaurants before he moved south. Alma, his new downtown restaurant, began as many months of pop-ups in Los Angeles, and Taymor’s unassuming modernist cooking fit into underused spaces like a hermit crab into its shell.

When it slipped into its permanent space a few months ago, in a barely marked storefront next door to a taxi-dance parlor on South Broadway, it still felt like a pop-up. The most memorable bit of décor in the restaurant was a Chez Panisse poster displayed under cracked glass. The restaurant was refinished, and there are now sleek fixtures, blond-wood veneers and upholstered benches comfortable enough to lounge on for hours, but it will not be mistaken for Spago anytime soon.

A meal at Alma is likely to begin with seaweed and tofu beignets. The beignets superficially resemble the green tofu balls at Starry Kitchen, but the taste is closer to that of the hair-seaweed yellowfish fritters you see in Shanghainese restaurants. They are set on dabs of citrusy mayonnaise, and they are dabbed with a bit of yuzu kosho, a tart, fragrant paste of chile and Japanese yuzu zest.

You might see a spare salad, shreds of radicchio and curly endive interspersed with foraged chickweed, dock and oxalis, dressed with horseradish and a little crème fraîche, sprinkled with tiny bits of nuts and seeds. You are not quite sure what any one bite you are eating might be, but it tastes gloriously, of early California fall. Bowls of crisped sprouting broccoli, crunchy as any kale chips, hide spoonfuls of aioli reddened with Basque pepper. Slices of toasted baguette, smeared with puréed dates, are served with a smooth, cool mound of rabbit-liver mousse, rich as foie gras.

Alma is without an alcohol license at the moment, although one is pending, so the kitchen concocts its own, barely sweetened soda pops to match the cuisine — one with fresh ginger, a vanilla-black lime pop that reproduces most of the sensations of a California Chardonnay, and something called Red 40, flavored with beets. The food is pretty hard to pair with wine at any rate — of all the alcohol I’ve brought into Alma, the most successful was probably a super-funky bottle of natural Basque cider. When you ask about what to drink at the wine shop around the corner, the proprietor only shrugs.

You never quite know what you’re going to find at the restaurant, where the menu changes almost every night. One evening there might be a soup

of miso and puréed celery root, striking a teetering balance between earthiness and umami, spiked with a few cubes of pickled pear the next, a mild purée of parsnip and poached black garlic sweetened with apple or vegetables in a puddle of dashi, enhanced by what you later find out is not tofu but whipped ox marrow.

If you spot something ordinary like lamb, it will have been braised with super-salty clams and served on a bed of braised sunflower seeds swirled on the plate in a way that makes them look like a school of sardines. (Could the seeds really be all pointing in the same direction, or is that a visual trick?) You will all but ignore the crackly skinned roast chicken when you come across the sweet, shriveled, butter-soaked carrots on the plate. (Those carrots are often served as a main course too, and you don’t have to be a vegetarian to think that they are the best things at the restaurant.)

You may have seen dishes like this at Manresa or Coi in the Bay Area, but nobody is cooking quite like this in L.A. at the moment. This is a modest but sure step toward the cuisine most often seen in restaurants with six-month waiting lists and $145 tasting menus.

Taymor and his cooks work behind a diner counter, gliding between the cold station and the stove, stopping occasionally by the immersion circulator, the Pacojet, and the high-tech blender breaking up trayfuls of cake into ragged shards and measuring out purées by the spoonful. Taymor works with a forager, so your plates are likely to include three different kinds of sweet clover instead of basil or thyme.

I once asked him about a clump of vivid, translucent fruit garnishing a scallop, and he told me they were nightshade berries.

“Don’t worry,” he said. “The leaves would make you pretty sick. But the berries? The berries are fine.”

Talented young chef Ari Taymor is making the transition from pop-up to real restaurant. This could be the start of something big.

952 S. Broadway, Los Angeles, (213) 444-0984, alma-la.com.

Snacks, $5-$6 starters, $9-$13 main courses $15-$25 desserts, $9. Tuesday prix fixe menu, $45.

Dinner Tues.-Sat., 6 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. AE, MC, V accepted. BYOB. Lot parking just north of restaurant. Vegetarian options available.

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Jonathan Gold was the restaurant critic for the Los Angeles Times. He won the Pulitzer Prize in criticism in 2007 and was a finalist again in 2011. A Los Angeles native, he began writing the Counter Intelligence column for the L.A. Weekly in 1986, wrote about death metal and gangsta rap for Rolling Stone and Spin among other places, and was delighted that he managed to forge a career out of the professional eating of tacos. Gold died July 21, 2018.

More From the Los Angeles Times

You can buy a plethora of earthquake kits online, but which ones are the best for the price? Here’s a look at four off-the-shelf options.


Tofu for Beginners (with 50+ recipes)

Are you new to a plant-based diet and fearing tofu? You’ve heard that it’s bland and think you won’t like it? Perhaps you’ve tried it a couple of times and really didn’t like it. BUT you’d be willing to give it a try if you just knew what to do with it!

This is a question that I’ve seen come up time and time again in vegan social media groups. Those new to veganism want to incorporate tofu into their diets but are unsure about how to prepare tofu, how to cook tofu, or what the difference is between all those different types of tofu!

So I wrote Tofu For Beginners to give you a brief introduction to the different types of tofu and its preparation. I’ve also compiled a list of more than 50 recipes for your perusal, starting with super easy ones to get you started through to amazing tofu wizardry that will hopefully inspire you to continue experimenting with this versatile ingredient.

You needn’t be nervous about cooking with tofu a good recipe will tell you which type to buy and how to prepare it. It was really hard impossible to choose just 50 recipes to include in this roundup as there’s so much you can do with tofu!

I’ve tried to include a variety of recipes for breakfast, lunch, dinner and even dessert recipes for appetizers, main dishes, condiments, sauces, sides and snacks and recipes from a variety of cuisines. These 50+ recipes are very much just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to cooking with tofu, if you need even more inspiration, let Google be your guide!

Tofu 101

Silken and regular: these are the two basic categories of tofu. Silken is Japanese style and is usually sold in boxes that do no need to be refrigerated. Regular is Chinese style and is often sold in plastic containers or wrapped in plastic in the refrigerated section of your supermarket.

Silken tofu is the creamiest type of tofu because it is unpressed and it is labeled with different consistencies depending on how much soy protein it contains. Silken tofu is best for blending into sauces, creams, smoothies, baking, mayo and dressings, or in miso soup. You do not press or fry silken tofu.

Regular tofu is also labeled with different consistencies from soft through to extra firm depending on how much water has been pressed out of it. Regular Chinese soft tofu is similar to Japanese silken tofu but not quite as smooth and creamy. You can often use it in the same way as silken tofu.

Medium through extra firm regular tofu are progressively more compact with a lower water content. These types of tofu can be pressed to remove even more of the water. Firm and extra firm are the most common types called for in recipes that involve frying or baking the tofu. Regular extra firm tofu is my personal preference and the type I use most often in my kitchen.

Keep in mind that different brands of tofu can be different in terms of consistency. One brand's medium tofu might be similar in consistency to another brand's soft tofu. If your recipes doesn't seem to work out correctly, it could be because of a difference in brand between you and the recipe developer. Don't despair! Try a couple of different brands to find one that you like and performs the best for the recipes you want to make.

To Freeze Or Not To Freeze?

Firstly, you don’t want to freeze silken or soft tofu. Medium through extra firm tofu can be frozen if you choose to do so, but it’s not necessary. You can use your tofu straight out of the box if you don’t have time to freeze it however, freezing, thawing and pressing tofu draws out moisture and creates a more spongy texture that will suck up more of your sauce.

Personally, I freeze tofu for convenience because I buy it in bulk at an Asian supermarket downtown for $1.28 for 600 grams. Once home, I cut it into smaller blocks and freeze it in Tupperware containers filled with water. If you buy smaller blocks, just toss them packaged into the freezer, no need to drain or cut. When I want to use it, I thaw it overnight in the refrigerator then cut it into slices to press.

How To Press Tofu

Medium through extra-firm regular tofu can be pressed if you choose (don't try pressing silken or soft tofu). Pressing tofu is very easy and you don’t need a fancy tofu press. You can press a whole block of tofu, but I find that cutting it into slices first helps to press out even more moisture.

First, drain the tofu of its packing water and slice it (how thick will depend on what you’re using it for). Then, find the most absorbent dish towels (or even bath towels) you have. Sandwich the tofu slices between paper towels to avoid any fuzz, and then the dish towels. Place something heavy on top I use biology textbooks but cans and pots also work well.

15 minutes is usually long enough to get most of the water out of sliced tofu. If you’re pressing a whole block, give it at least 30 minutes. If your recipe calls for diced or cubed tofu, it’s easier to dice it after you’ve pressed the slices rather than trying to press all the little cubes.

What To Do With Leftover Tofu

You can refrigerate or freeze leftover tofu for later. If you’re going to use it within a week, simply place it in a container, cover it with water and refrigerate. Change the water daily.

Freezing silken tofu is a bit dodgy and you may find the thawed texture unpleasant (or not, give it a try!) Freeze leftover medium through extra-firm regular tofu by slicing it at placing it on a pan in the freezer. Once frozen, transfer it to a freezer bag. Use within three months.

Recipes For Tofu Newbies

    - Cookie and Kate - Minimalist Baker - The Kitchn - Joy the Baker - The Blender Girl (pictured) - Food & Wine - VegKitchen - Well Vegan - The Veganista (pictured) - Oh My Veggies - Isa Chandra - Vegangela - Cilantro and Citronella (pictured) - Spoon University - The Vegan Corner - Green Evi - Vegan Richa - Connoisseurus Veg (pictured) - Kitchen Treaty - Carrots and Flowers - Kirbie's Cravings (pictured)

Taking Off The Tofu Training Wheels

    - The Spruce - Little Spice Jar - I Love Vegan (pictured) - Sweet Cannela - I Love Vegan - Simply Quinoa (pictured) - Connoisseurus Veg - In Pursuit of More - Healthy Happy Life - Lazy Cat Kitchen (pictured) - Cilantro and Citronella - Minimalist Baker - Pickled Plum (pictured) - Dietitian Debbie Dishes - Cilantro and Citronella - Making Thyme for Health (pictured) - Quite Good Food - The Wanderlust Kitchen - Oh My Veggies (pictured)

Tofu Wizardry

    - Olives for Dinner - The Viet Vegan (pictured) - The Debrief - Olives for Dinner (pictured) - Cilantro and Citronella - The Veg Life - The Stingy Vegan (pictured) - Connoisseurus Veg - Vanilla and Bean - Unconventional Baker (pictured) - The Spruce - The Vegan Corner - Brewing Happiness

This post may contain affiliate links which help offset the cost of running this blog with no additional cost to you.


Chef Film Recipes Episode

The Chef Show's third episode highlights YouTuber Andrew Rea (Binging with Babish) as they three of them attempt to make a chocolate lava cake along with other recipes from the Chef film.

Berries & Cream: Brittle Dust, Sugar, Mint, Strawberries, Blackberries, Whipped Cream, Grand Marnier, Raspberries, and Blueberries.

Chocolate Lave Cake: Unsalted Butter, Dark Chocolate, Sugar, Eggs, Strawberries, Blueberries, Cocoa Powder, Vanilla Extract, Powdered Sugar, Raw Sugar, Grand Marnier, All Purpose Flower, Heavy Cream, and Light Brown Sugar.

Beignets: Cafe Du Monde Beignet Mix, Water, and Powdered Sugar.


The Bitten Word

It's here! We're officially kicking off the results of this year's Cover to Cover Challenge!

Over the past couple weeks, as assignments went out, some Bitten Word readers told us they were having dreams about which dish they'd be assigned. (Some may have been having nightmares.) To be honest, that tickled us endlessly.

For those of you who haven't been following along, we've challenged our readers to cook every dish in the September issue of Bon Appetit magazine. And everyone enthusiastically responded. Nearly 500 of you signed up to make a dish within a week. And even better, nearly 300 readers were able to complete the challenge. Some readers even completed their dishes the day the assignments were given out! 

We were pumped to see the results roll in over the last week. Trust us: This going to be good. There's deliciousness. There's disappointment. There are looks of disgust but also lots of people enthusastically embracing dishes and ingredients that are way, way outside their comfort zone. 

And there's at least one explosion. 

Over the next few weeks, we'll be rolling out the results, course by course, starting today with Appetizers & Beverages. 

Last week, Bon Appétit interviewed us about the Cover to Cover Challenge. You can read our Q&A on their website to hear a little more about the challenge and the history of this blog. 

Anyway, enough intro. Ready to start the Cover to Cover Challenge?

Three standouts for us were a Classic Potted Pork, Seaweed and Tofu Beignets with Lime Mayonnaise, and a Fermented Grape Soda. Now that's the stuff a wacky dinner party is made of.

There are other interesting dishes as well. Here are the links to all the Appetizer & Beverage entries. Check them out!  And please leave comments -- we know the cooks who put in all the hard work in their kitchens will love reading your thoughts and observations. You're an insightful bunch. 


Archives

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Cauliflower steaks with salsa verde summer farro salad

Organic pale miso-roasted aubergine with gai lan & baby bok choi,
mango & soba noodle

Soca pancakes, caponata, marmara tapenade with orange thyme and saffron dressing

Marmite of artichoke & fennel with Moroccan lemon, fresh basil oil
& barley jeweled couscous

Heritage cauliflower & romanesco, gobi masala with cauliflower pakora & pea pilau

Paper dosa with sambal & coconut chutney

All of our menus are created uniquely for your event
These dishes are not set menus but are here simply here to whet your appetite


Recipe Summary

  • 2 ounces rice vermicelli
  • 8 rice wrappers (8.5 inch diameter)
  • 8 large cooked shrimp - peeled, deveined and cut in half
  • 1 ⅓ tablespoons chopped fresh Thai basil
  • 3 tablespoons chopped fresh mint leaves
  • 3 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro
  • 2 leaves lettuce, chopped
  • 4 teaspoons fish sauce
  • ¼ cup water
  • 2 tablespoons fresh lime juice
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 2 tablespoons white sugar
  • ½ teaspoon garlic chili sauce
  • 3 tablespoons hoisin sauce
  • 1 teaspoon finely chopped peanuts

Bring a medium saucepan of water to boil. Boil rice vermicelli 3 to 5 minutes, or until al dente, and drain.

Fill a large bowl with warm water. Dip one wrapper into the hot water for 1 second to soften. Lay wrapper flat. In a row across the center, place 2 shrimp halves, a handful of vermicelli, basil, mint, cilantro and lettuce, leaving about 2 inches uncovered on each side. Fold uncovered sides inward, then tightly roll the wrapper, beginning at the end with the lettuce. Repeat with remaining ingredients.

In a small bowl, mix the fish sauce, water, lime juice, garlic, sugar and chili sauce.

In another small bowl, mix the hoisin sauce and peanuts.

Serve rolled spring rolls with the fish sauce and hoisin sauce mixtures.


12.05.2010

Apple Chutney

Here's a recipe for a great appetizer that Melissa and I made for Jen and Dave when they were at our house for New Year's Eve last year. It was originally inspired by an appetizer we had at a restaurant called The Lost Dog Cafe in Binghamton, NY. We like to serve this apple chutney with baked brie and toasted French bread.

• 3 tart apples - peeled, cored, and finely chopped

• 1/4 yellow onion, quartered

• 5/8 (1 inch) piece fresh ginger root, peeled

• 3 tablespoons and 1/2 teaspoon white wine vinegar

• 1 tablespoon and 1-3/4 teaspoons white sugar

• 1 tablespoon and 1-3/4 teaspoons brown sugar

• 1/8 teaspoon ground cardamom

• 1/8 teaspoon ground nutmeg

1. In a saucepan, mix the apples, onion, ginger, vinegar, white sugar, brown sugar, cinnamon, white pepper, cardamom, and nutmeg.

𔆒. Bring to a boil, reduce heat, and cover.


3. Simmer 30 minutes, stirring frequently, until the apples are tender.


4. Mix in some water if necessary to keep the ingredients moist.


5. Remove the onion and ginger, and store in the refrigerator until ready to serve.


Watch the video: ΦΤΙΑΞΤΕ ΜΑΓΙΟΝΕΖΑ ΧΩΡΙΣ ΑΥΓΑ