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The Best Egg Tarts in Hong Kong

The Best Egg Tarts in Hong Kong


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Oh, the ubiquitous Hong Kong egg tart. What used to be a simple pastry crust with sweet egg custard filling has turned into a plethora of egg white tarts, honey-egg tarts, chocolate tarts, green tea tarts – the list goes on.

With so many options, how is one to choose? So many tarts and so little time. I enlisted the help of an esteemed panel of judges, both expats and locals, all with a serious sweet tooth. We lined up seven tasty egg tarts from all over Hong Kong and got to “work.” Did Tai Cheong’s famous egg tart make the top of the list? Read on and find out!

#6 (Tie): Arome Egg White Tart

This was easily the prettiest of the bunch and certainly one of the less traditional tarts we tried, but it left much to be desired. The crust was “nice,” but the filling had the consistency of whipped cream, leading one taster to say, “I don’t really want to finish it.”

#6 (Tie): Hoixe Egg Tart

Hoixe’s egg tart had a “weird clay aftertaste,” and several judges agreed the custard was just too solid for their liking. If you’re going to hit up Hoixe for dessert, their other pastries might be the way to go.

#5: Tsui Wah Egg Tart

Tsui Wah’s restaurants are better known for their delicious food, but pay closer attention and you might find a warm egg tart with your name on it. This crust was the flakiest of them all with a lesser sweet custard filling, something we agreed might appeal to more traditional tastes.

#4: Bakery King Egg Tart

With a name like Bakery King, this had to be good. Well, not had to, but luckily, it was. The crust had “particularly good structural integrity,” which is code for, “My egg tart didn’t fall apart on the first bite.” All in all, a solid choice of tarts.

#3: Door Door Egg Tart

While many of the egg tarts in the lineup are from chain bakeries, Door Door’s sole location is in Mei Foo — and clearly the tarts are worth it. This custard had a perfectly creamy consistency, but the sweetness was a little heavy for some tasters.

#2: Tai Cheong Egg Tart

These egg tarts from “Hong Kong’s most loved egg tart bakery” gained fame as the favorite of Hong Kong’s final British governor, Chris Patten. Tai Cheong’s version of the dessert is milder with a less eggy flavor, but it definitely commands serious respect from our taste buds.

#1: Door Door Portuguese Egg Tart

The results are in, and the panel’s favorite is the Portuguese style egg tart from Door Door bakery. While we enjoyed the ever-so-slightly caramelized custard, the crust also left quite a favorable impression – a puff pastry that was chewy, flaky, and delicious. If you ever find yourself in Mei Foo, make sure to pick one up. If not, get on the MTR (Mass Transit Railway) - these tarts are worth it!


Hong Kong Egg Tarts


Do you pass by recipes that look like they’re too much to mess with? I do it all the time, often finding out later how easy many of those recipes really are. Take these Hong Kong Egg Tarts submitted by Kristy of eatplaylove, for example. At first glance, I thought they’d be more involved, with water baths, tempering cream and eggs, or the like. Thankfully, a friend—who happens to have excellent tastes—mentioned that they were one of her favorite desserts when she frequents Chinese restaurants. Kristy also mentions in the recipe that they’re listed on The World’s 50 Most Delicious Foods as compiled by CNN Go.

I’d never heard of them before but I was intrigued to see what the fuss was all about. I was happy to find them quite easy to make. So easy that I made two batches in two days, and for the second batch I dropped the crust for a gluten-free version. Of course they’re tasty, or I wouldn’t have made the second batch. They kind of remind me of a custard pie my grandmother used to make.


This ingredient list is short. Begin with water, sugar, eggs, evaporated milk, vanilla, and prepared tart shells. Use your favorite pie crust recipe, or take a shortcut and use pre-made like I did. I found frozen mini tart shells at our local grocer. For the gluten-free version, I used small ramekins (see the end of this post) sprayed with cooking spray.


Start by combining the water and sugar in a sauce pan and heating it to a boil. Set aside to let cool.


Next, in a large mixing bowl, beat the eggs together.


Add in the evaporated milk and combine well.


Once the sugar water mixture has cooled a bit, gradually add it into the egg/milk mixture, as well as the vanilla.


Mix it all up! See? How easy is that! Almost finished.


To avoid any clumps, pour the custard into the individual tart shells (or ramekins) through a sieve.


Bake according to recipe below. The egg mixture will slightly rise and set, and the crust should be golden brown.


If going with a gluten-free version, again, pour the egg mixture through a sieve into coated ramekins. Bake for the same time as stated in recipe below.


I sprinkled a little cinnamon on top for a nice addition.


Such an easy recipe, but with simple additions, like berries, coconut, or chocolate, you could easily change this basic recipe for year-round goodness.

Thanks to Kristy for bringing this delightful (and easy!) recipe to our attention. It’s a keeper. And be sure to check her site Eat, Play, Love for this recipe (what a cutie patootie she has assisting on this one) and other wonderful offerings.


Hong Kong Egg Tarts


Do you pass by recipes that look like they’re too much to mess with? I do it all the time, often finding out later how easy many of those recipes really are. Take these Hong Kong Egg Tarts submitted by Kristy of eatplaylove, for example. At first glance, I thought they’d be more involved, with water baths, tempering cream and eggs, or the like. Thankfully, a friend—who happens to have excellent tastes—mentioned that they were one of her favorite desserts when she frequents Chinese restaurants. Kristy also mentions in the recipe that they’re listed on The World’s 50 Most Delicious Foods as compiled by CNN Go.

I’d never heard of them before but I was intrigued to see what the fuss was all about. I was happy to find them quite easy to make. So easy that I made two batches in two days, and for the second batch I dropped the crust for a gluten-free version. Of course they’re tasty, or I wouldn’t have made the second batch. They kind of remind me of a custard pie my grandmother used to make.


This ingredient list is short. Begin with water, sugar, eggs, evaporated milk, vanilla, and prepared tart shells. Use your favorite pie crust recipe, or take a shortcut and use pre-made like I did. I found frozen mini tart shells at our local grocer. For the gluten-free version, I used small ramekins (see the end of this post) sprayed with cooking spray.


Start by combining the water and sugar in a sauce pan and heating it to a boil. Set aside to let cool.


Next, in a large mixing bowl, beat the eggs together.


Add in the evaporated milk and combine well.


Once the sugar water mixture has cooled a bit, gradually add it into the egg/milk mixture, as well as the vanilla.


Mix it all up! See? How easy is that! Almost finished.


To avoid any clumps, pour the custard into the individual tart shells (or ramekins) through a sieve.


Bake according to recipe below. The egg mixture will slightly rise and set, and the crust should be golden brown.


If going with a gluten-free version, again, pour the egg mixture through a sieve into coated ramekins. Bake for the same time as stated in recipe below.


I sprinkled a little cinnamon on top for a nice addition.


Such an easy recipe, but with simple additions, like berries, coconut, or chocolate, you could easily change this basic recipe for year-round goodness.

Thanks to Kristy for bringing this delightful (and easy!) recipe to our attention. It’s a keeper. And be sure to check her site Eat, Play, Love for this recipe (what a cutie patootie she has assisting on this one) and other wonderful offerings.


Hong Kong Egg Tarts


Do you pass by recipes that look like they’re too much to mess with? I do it all the time, often finding out later how easy many of those recipes really are. Take these Hong Kong Egg Tarts submitted by Kristy of eatplaylove, for example. At first glance, I thought they’d be more involved, with water baths, tempering cream and eggs, or the like. Thankfully, a friend—who happens to have excellent tastes—mentioned that they were one of her favorite desserts when she frequents Chinese restaurants. Kristy also mentions in the recipe that they’re listed on The World’s 50 Most Delicious Foods as compiled by CNN Go.

I’d never heard of them before but I was intrigued to see what the fuss was all about. I was happy to find them quite easy to make. So easy that I made two batches in two days, and for the second batch I dropped the crust for a gluten-free version. Of course they’re tasty, or I wouldn’t have made the second batch. They kind of remind me of a custard pie my grandmother used to make.


This ingredient list is short. Begin with water, sugar, eggs, evaporated milk, vanilla, and prepared tart shells. Use your favorite pie crust recipe, or take a shortcut and use pre-made like I did. I found frozen mini tart shells at our local grocer. For the gluten-free version, I used small ramekins (see the end of this post) sprayed with cooking spray.


Start by combining the water and sugar in a sauce pan and heating it to a boil. Set aside to let cool.


Next, in a large mixing bowl, beat the eggs together.


Add in the evaporated milk and combine well.


Once the sugar water mixture has cooled a bit, gradually add it into the egg/milk mixture, as well as the vanilla.


Mix it all up! See? How easy is that! Almost finished.


To avoid any clumps, pour the custard into the individual tart shells (or ramekins) through a sieve.


Bake according to recipe below. The egg mixture will slightly rise and set, and the crust should be golden brown.


If going with a gluten-free version, again, pour the egg mixture through a sieve into coated ramekins. Bake for the same time as stated in recipe below.


I sprinkled a little cinnamon on top for a nice addition.


Such an easy recipe, but with simple additions, like berries, coconut, or chocolate, you could easily change this basic recipe for year-round goodness.

Thanks to Kristy for bringing this delightful (and easy!) recipe to our attention. It’s a keeper. And be sure to check her site Eat, Play, Love for this recipe (what a cutie patootie she has assisting on this one) and other wonderful offerings.


Hong Kong Egg Tarts


Do you pass by recipes that look like they’re too much to mess with? I do it all the time, often finding out later how easy many of those recipes really are. Take these Hong Kong Egg Tarts submitted by Kristy of eatplaylove, for example. At first glance, I thought they’d be more involved, with water baths, tempering cream and eggs, or the like. Thankfully, a friend—who happens to have excellent tastes—mentioned that they were one of her favorite desserts when she frequents Chinese restaurants. Kristy also mentions in the recipe that they’re listed on The World’s 50 Most Delicious Foods as compiled by CNN Go.

I’d never heard of them before but I was intrigued to see what the fuss was all about. I was happy to find them quite easy to make. So easy that I made two batches in two days, and for the second batch I dropped the crust for a gluten-free version. Of course they’re tasty, or I wouldn’t have made the second batch. They kind of remind me of a custard pie my grandmother used to make.


This ingredient list is short. Begin with water, sugar, eggs, evaporated milk, vanilla, and prepared tart shells. Use your favorite pie crust recipe, or take a shortcut and use pre-made like I did. I found frozen mini tart shells at our local grocer. For the gluten-free version, I used small ramekins (see the end of this post) sprayed with cooking spray.


Start by combining the water and sugar in a sauce pan and heating it to a boil. Set aside to let cool.


Next, in a large mixing bowl, beat the eggs together.


Add in the evaporated milk and combine well.


Once the sugar water mixture has cooled a bit, gradually add it into the egg/milk mixture, as well as the vanilla.


Mix it all up! See? How easy is that! Almost finished.


To avoid any clumps, pour the custard into the individual tart shells (or ramekins) through a sieve.


Bake according to recipe below. The egg mixture will slightly rise and set, and the crust should be golden brown.


If going with a gluten-free version, again, pour the egg mixture through a sieve into coated ramekins. Bake for the same time as stated in recipe below.


I sprinkled a little cinnamon on top for a nice addition.


Such an easy recipe, but with simple additions, like berries, coconut, or chocolate, you could easily change this basic recipe for year-round goodness.

Thanks to Kristy for bringing this delightful (and easy!) recipe to our attention. It’s a keeper. And be sure to check her site Eat, Play, Love for this recipe (what a cutie patootie she has assisting on this one) and other wonderful offerings.


Hong Kong Egg Tarts


Do you pass by recipes that look like they’re too much to mess with? I do it all the time, often finding out later how easy many of those recipes really are. Take these Hong Kong Egg Tarts submitted by Kristy of eatplaylove, for example. At first glance, I thought they’d be more involved, with water baths, tempering cream and eggs, or the like. Thankfully, a friend—who happens to have excellent tastes—mentioned that they were one of her favorite desserts when she frequents Chinese restaurants. Kristy also mentions in the recipe that they’re listed on The World’s 50 Most Delicious Foods as compiled by CNN Go.

I’d never heard of them before but I was intrigued to see what the fuss was all about. I was happy to find them quite easy to make. So easy that I made two batches in two days, and for the second batch I dropped the crust for a gluten-free version. Of course they’re tasty, or I wouldn’t have made the second batch. They kind of remind me of a custard pie my grandmother used to make.


This ingredient list is short. Begin with water, sugar, eggs, evaporated milk, vanilla, and prepared tart shells. Use your favorite pie crust recipe, or take a shortcut and use pre-made like I did. I found frozen mini tart shells at our local grocer. For the gluten-free version, I used small ramekins (see the end of this post) sprayed with cooking spray.


Start by combining the water and sugar in a sauce pan and heating it to a boil. Set aside to let cool.


Next, in a large mixing bowl, beat the eggs together.


Add in the evaporated milk and combine well.


Once the sugar water mixture has cooled a bit, gradually add it into the egg/milk mixture, as well as the vanilla.


Mix it all up! See? How easy is that! Almost finished.


To avoid any clumps, pour the custard into the individual tart shells (or ramekins) through a sieve.


Bake according to recipe below. The egg mixture will slightly rise and set, and the crust should be golden brown.


If going with a gluten-free version, again, pour the egg mixture through a sieve into coated ramekins. Bake for the same time as stated in recipe below.


I sprinkled a little cinnamon on top for a nice addition.


Such an easy recipe, but with simple additions, like berries, coconut, or chocolate, you could easily change this basic recipe for year-round goodness.

Thanks to Kristy for bringing this delightful (and easy!) recipe to our attention. It’s a keeper. And be sure to check her site Eat, Play, Love for this recipe (what a cutie patootie she has assisting on this one) and other wonderful offerings.


Hong Kong Egg Tarts


Do you pass by recipes that look like they’re too much to mess with? I do it all the time, often finding out later how easy many of those recipes really are. Take these Hong Kong Egg Tarts submitted by Kristy of eatplaylove, for example. At first glance, I thought they’d be more involved, with water baths, tempering cream and eggs, or the like. Thankfully, a friend—who happens to have excellent tastes—mentioned that they were one of her favorite desserts when she frequents Chinese restaurants. Kristy also mentions in the recipe that they’re listed on The World’s 50 Most Delicious Foods as compiled by CNN Go.

I’d never heard of them before but I was intrigued to see what the fuss was all about. I was happy to find them quite easy to make. So easy that I made two batches in two days, and for the second batch I dropped the crust for a gluten-free version. Of course they’re tasty, or I wouldn’t have made the second batch. They kind of remind me of a custard pie my grandmother used to make.


This ingredient list is short. Begin with water, sugar, eggs, evaporated milk, vanilla, and prepared tart shells. Use your favorite pie crust recipe, or take a shortcut and use pre-made like I did. I found frozen mini tart shells at our local grocer. For the gluten-free version, I used small ramekins (see the end of this post) sprayed with cooking spray.


Start by combining the water and sugar in a sauce pan and heating it to a boil. Set aside to let cool.


Next, in a large mixing bowl, beat the eggs together.


Add in the evaporated milk and combine well.


Once the sugar water mixture has cooled a bit, gradually add it into the egg/milk mixture, as well as the vanilla.


Mix it all up! See? How easy is that! Almost finished.


To avoid any clumps, pour the custard into the individual tart shells (or ramekins) through a sieve.


Bake according to recipe below. The egg mixture will slightly rise and set, and the crust should be golden brown.


If going with a gluten-free version, again, pour the egg mixture through a sieve into coated ramekins. Bake for the same time as stated in recipe below.


I sprinkled a little cinnamon on top for a nice addition.


Such an easy recipe, but with simple additions, like berries, coconut, or chocolate, you could easily change this basic recipe for year-round goodness.

Thanks to Kristy for bringing this delightful (and easy!) recipe to our attention. It’s a keeper. And be sure to check her site Eat, Play, Love for this recipe (what a cutie patootie she has assisting on this one) and other wonderful offerings.


Hong Kong Egg Tarts


Do you pass by recipes that look like they’re too much to mess with? I do it all the time, often finding out later how easy many of those recipes really are. Take these Hong Kong Egg Tarts submitted by Kristy of eatplaylove, for example. At first glance, I thought they’d be more involved, with water baths, tempering cream and eggs, or the like. Thankfully, a friend—who happens to have excellent tastes—mentioned that they were one of her favorite desserts when she frequents Chinese restaurants. Kristy also mentions in the recipe that they’re listed on The World’s 50 Most Delicious Foods as compiled by CNN Go.

I’d never heard of them before but I was intrigued to see what the fuss was all about. I was happy to find them quite easy to make. So easy that I made two batches in two days, and for the second batch I dropped the crust for a gluten-free version. Of course they’re tasty, or I wouldn’t have made the second batch. They kind of remind me of a custard pie my grandmother used to make.


This ingredient list is short. Begin with water, sugar, eggs, evaporated milk, vanilla, and prepared tart shells. Use your favorite pie crust recipe, or take a shortcut and use pre-made like I did. I found frozen mini tart shells at our local grocer. For the gluten-free version, I used small ramekins (see the end of this post) sprayed with cooking spray.


Start by combining the water and sugar in a sauce pan and heating it to a boil. Set aside to let cool.


Next, in a large mixing bowl, beat the eggs together.


Add in the evaporated milk and combine well.


Once the sugar water mixture has cooled a bit, gradually add it into the egg/milk mixture, as well as the vanilla.


Mix it all up! See? How easy is that! Almost finished.


To avoid any clumps, pour the custard into the individual tart shells (or ramekins) through a sieve.


Bake according to recipe below. The egg mixture will slightly rise and set, and the crust should be golden brown.


If going with a gluten-free version, again, pour the egg mixture through a sieve into coated ramekins. Bake for the same time as stated in recipe below.


I sprinkled a little cinnamon on top for a nice addition.


Such an easy recipe, but with simple additions, like berries, coconut, or chocolate, you could easily change this basic recipe for year-round goodness.

Thanks to Kristy for bringing this delightful (and easy!) recipe to our attention. It’s a keeper. And be sure to check her site Eat, Play, Love for this recipe (what a cutie patootie she has assisting on this one) and other wonderful offerings.


Hong Kong Egg Tarts


Do you pass by recipes that look like they’re too much to mess with? I do it all the time, often finding out later how easy many of those recipes really are. Take these Hong Kong Egg Tarts submitted by Kristy of eatplaylove, for example. At first glance, I thought they’d be more involved, with water baths, tempering cream and eggs, or the like. Thankfully, a friend—who happens to have excellent tastes—mentioned that they were one of her favorite desserts when she frequents Chinese restaurants. Kristy also mentions in the recipe that they’re listed on The World’s 50 Most Delicious Foods as compiled by CNN Go.

I’d never heard of them before but I was intrigued to see what the fuss was all about. I was happy to find them quite easy to make. So easy that I made two batches in two days, and for the second batch I dropped the crust for a gluten-free version. Of course they’re tasty, or I wouldn’t have made the second batch. They kind of remind me of a custard pie my grandmother used to make.


This ingredient list is short. Begin with water, sugar, eggs, evaporated milk, vanilla, and prepared tart shells. Use your favorite pie crust recipe, or take a shortcut and use pre-made like I did. I found frozen mini tart shells at our local grocer. For the gluten-free version, I used small ramekins (see the end of this post) sprayed with cooking spray.


Start by combining the water and sugar in a sauce pan and heating it to a boil. Set aside to let cool.


Next, in a large mixing bowl, beat the eggs together.


Add in the evaporated milk and combine well.


Once the sugar water mixture has cooled a bit, gradually add it into the egg/milk mixture, as well as the vanilla.


Mix it all up! See? How easy is that! Almost finished.


To avoid any clumps, pour the custard into the individual tart shells (or ramekins) through a sieve.


Bake according to recipe below. The egg mixture will slightly rise and set, and the crust should be golden brown.


If going with a gluten-free version, again, pour the egg mixture through a sieve into coated ramekins. Bake for the same time as stated in recipe below.


I sprinkled a little cinnamon on top for a nice addition.


Such an easy recipe, but with simple additions, like berries, coconut, or chocolate, you could easily change this basic recipe for year-round goodness.

Thanks to Kristy for bringing this delightful (and easy!) recipe to our attention. It’s a keeper. And be sure to check her site Eat, Play, Love for this recipe (what a cutie patootie she has assisting on this one) and other wonderful offerings.


Hong Kong Egg Tarts


Do you pass by recipes that look like they’re too much to mess with? I do it all the time, often finding out later how easy many of those recipes really are. Take these Hong Kong Egg Tarts submitted by Kristy of eatplaylove, for example. At first glance, I thought they’d be more involved, with water baths, tempering cream and eggs, or the like. Thankfully, a friend—who happens to have excellent tastes—mentioned that they were one of her favorite desserts when she frequents Chinese restaurants. Kristy also mentions in the recipe that they’re listed on The World’s 50 Most Delicious Foods as compiled by CNN Go.

I’d never heard of them before but I was intrigued to see what the fuss was all about. I was happy to find them quite easy to make. So easy that I made two batches in two days, and for the second batch I dropped the crust for a gluten-free version. Of course they’re tasty, or I wouldn’t have made the second batch. They kind of remind me of a custard pie my grandmother used to make.


This ingredient list is short. Begin with water, sugar, eggs, evaporated milk, vanilla, and prepared tart shells. Use your favorite pie crust recipe, or take a shortcut and use pre-made like I did. I found frozen mini tart shells at our local grocer. For the gluten-free version, I used small ramekins (see the end of this post) sprayed with cooking spray.


Start by combining the water and sugar in a sauce pan and heating it to a boil. Set aside to let cool.


Next, in a large mixing bowl, beat the eggs together.


Add in the evaporated milk and combine well.


Once the sugar water mixture has cooled a bit, gradually add it into the egg/milk mixture, as well as the vanilla.


Mix it all up! See? How easy is that! Almost finished.


To avoid any clumps, pour the custard into the individual tart shells (or ramekins) through a sieve.


Bake according to recipe below. The egg mixture will slightly rise and set, and the crust should be golden brown.


If going with a gluten-free version, again, pour the egg mixture through a sieve into coated ramekins. Bake for the same time as stated in recipe below.


I sprinkled a little cinnamon on top for a nice addition.


Such an easy recipe, but with simple additions, like berries, coconut, or chocolate, you could easily change this basic recipe for year-round goodness.

Thanks to Kristy for bringing this delightful (and easy!) recipe to our attention. It’s a keeper. And be sure to check her site Eat, Play, Love for this recipe (what a cutie patootie she has assisting on this one) and other wonderful offerings.


Hong Kong Egg Tarts


Do you pass by recipes that look like they’re too much to mess with? I do it all the time, often finding out later how easy many of those recipes really are. Take these Hong Kong Egg Tarts submitted by Kristy of eatplaylove, for example. At first glance, I thought they’d be more involved, with water baths, tempering cream and eggs, or the like. Thankfully, a friend—who happens to have excellent tastes—mentioned that they were one of her favorite desserts when she frequents Chinese restaurants. Kristy also mentions in the recipe that they’re listed on The World’s 50 Most Delicious Foods as compiled by CNN Go.

I’d never heard of them before but I was intrigued to see what the fuss was all about. I was happy to find them quite easy to make. So easy that I made two batches in two days, and for the second batch I dropped the crust for a gluten-free version. Of course they’re tasty, or I wouldn’t have made the second batch. They kind of remind me of a custard pie my grandmother used to make.


This ingredient list is short. Begin with water, sugar, eggs, evaporated milk, vanilla, and prepared tart shells. Use your favorite pie crust recipe, or take a shortcut and use pre-made like I did. I found frozen mini tart shells at our local grocer. For the gluten-free version, I used small ramekins (see the end of this post) sprayed with cooking spray.


Start by combining the water and sugar in a sauce pan and heating it to a boil. Set aside to let cool.


Next, in a large mixing bowl, beat the eggs together.


Add in the evaporated milk and combine well.


Once the sugar water mixture has cooled a bit, gradually add it into the egg/milk mixture, as well as the vanilla.


Mix it all up! See? How easy is that! Almost finished.


To avoid any clumps, pour the custard into the individual tart shells (or ramekins) through a sieve.


Bake according to recipe below. The egg mixture will slightly rise and set, and the crust should be golden brown.


If going with a gluten-free version, again, pour the egg mixture through a sieve into coated ramekins. Bake for the same time as stated in recipe below.


I sprinkled a little cinnamon on top for a nice addition.


Such an easy recipe, but with simple additions, like berries, coconut, or chocolate, you could easily change this basic recipe for year-round goodness.

Thanks to Kristy for bringing this delightful (and easy!) recipe to our attention. It’s a keeper. And be sure to check her site Eat, Play, Love for this recipe (what a cutie patootie she has assisting on this one) and other wonderful offerings.



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